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Four women who changed the face of physics

[ad_1] Donna Strickland has become only the third woman in history to win the Nobel prize for Physics. She joins Marie Curie, who won in 1903, and Maria Goeppert-Mayer, who was awarded the prize in 1963. Here are four other women who have changed the face of physics.Hertha Ayrton, British physicist and mathematician Birthplace: Born in Portsea, Hampshire, in 1854; died in 1923.Known for: British physicist who was the first
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‘Reasons to be hopeful’ on 1.5C global temperature target

[ad_1] Image copyright RADBOUD Dutch scientist Dr Heleen de Coninck is one of the co-ordinating lead authors of the forthcoming Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report on 1.5C which will be released next Monday in South Korea. Speaking to the BBC before the start of the negotiations in Incheon, she explained what her role involves and why, despite the enormous climate challenge facing the world, she believes there
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Why Sulawesi’s tsunami is puzzling scientists

[ad_1] Image copyright AFP Image caption The quake was large - but not of the type normally associated with a big tsunami event Friday's catastrophic tsunami event on Sulawesi Island is a puzzle.As the emergency response gathers pace, scientists are scratching their heads to understand why it generated such big waves.The magnitude 7.5 quake was certainly large - one of the biggest recorded anywhere on the globe this year.But it
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Pollution threatens the future of killer whales

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionPollution threatens future of killer whales Killer whales are in deep trouble because of persistent chemical pollution in the environment, researchers say. A new study suggests the long-term viability of more than half of the different orca groups around the globe is now in question. Some populations, such as those around the UK, the Strait of Gibraltar, off Brazil, Japan and
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Chile unveils Patagonian Route of Parks scenic trail

[ad_1] Image copyright AFP Image caption The region includes spectacular scenery Chile has launched a huge scenic route through its Patagonian wilderness to boost tourism and highlight the need for conservation.The Route of Parks covers 2,800km (1,740 miles) from the city of Puerto Montt down to Cape Horn. The trail was the idea of Tompkins Conservation, the foundation set up by US billionaire Douglas Tompkins and his wife Kristine. Last
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Taller plants moving into warmer Arctic

[ad_1] Image copyright Anne D. Bjorkman Image caption Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic: Salix arctica is the dominant shrub species The low-lying shrubs, grasses and other plants growing in the Arctic are getting taller.The finding comes from scientists who have analysed three decades of measurements. This data, gathered across Alaska, Canada, Iceland, Scandinavia and Russia, indicates that a warming climate is driving the change. The team of 180 researchers
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Why does Nigeria keep flooding?

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Lokoja, where the Niger and Benue rivers meet Heavy seasonal rains are a regular feature of life in Nigeria and towns close to the country's main rivers are particularly vulnerable.This year floods have killed almost 200 people with many thousands displaced. The National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) say these figures are likely to rise as the full impact becomes clear. A state of
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How China’s GPS ‘rival’ Beidou is plotting to go global

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Beidou's coverage is expanding rapidly, with more than 10 satellite launches in 2018 China has ambitions for its rapidly expanding Beidou satellite navigation system to serve the whole world, not just Asia, but will it really be able to rival the well-established - and US-owned - GPS system?Dalintai - a herder in northern China - used to travel miles every day on his
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‘They dammed everything’ – Bosnia’s hydropower gone sour

[ad_1] Image copyright Matic Oblak For an example of the ugly face of sustainable energy, environmentalists in Bosnia point to the Medna Dam on Bosnia's Sana River. Where there was once a free-flowing river, home to a population of Danube salmon, now there are piles of rubble, broken pipes and a concrete wall blocking in the water. The moss on the rocks shows how high the water used to reach
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Could Nasa’s James Webb Space Telescope detect alien life?

[ad_1] Image copyright NASA Image caption Webb contains novel technologies that have never previously been flown in space If it does launch as currently scheduled in 2021, it will be 14 years late. When finally in position, though - orbiting the Sun 1.5 million km from Earth - Nasa's James Webb Space Telescope promises an astronomical revolution. The US space agency boasts that it will literally "look back in time